Bruno Peres: I couldn’t turn down chance to join Roma

Tuttosport (Stefano Carina) There’s a saying in Brazil, which goes: “Os paulistas sabem viver, o resto do mundo vive sem samber“, which roughly translates as “Paulistas [people from Sao Paulo] know how to live, the rest of the world live without knowing it.” You just have to look at Bruno Peres, a Paulista himself, when he has a ball at his feet to realise how important this saying is to him. The Giallorossi #13 plays in the same way as he lives: with a smile on his face, and – even off the pitch – he’s rarely seen without that smile.

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Federico Balzaretti: Roma-Fiorentina will be a spectacular match

AS Roma Match Program (F. Viola) He ended his career at Roma, but he also spent part of his career in Florence. It may have only been for 6 months, but his time there left its mark. “I had a long career, and they were the only team I ever left in January,” says Federico Balzaretti, who is now part of Roma’s backroom staff.

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Dario Hubner: The calcio legend who took down Roma

AS Roma Match Program (Tiziano Riccardi) He once decided a Coppa Italia clash between Cesena and Roma. The only game between Cesena and Roma in Coppa Italia history, in fact. What’s more, he wasn’t playing for the Giallorossi, but for the Bianconeri. It was Carlos Bianchi’s first official game, and it wasn’t the best of starts for the Argentine coach who would end up being sacked a few months later for a lack of results. It was he who decided the game with a brace. Scoring goals was what he was best at doing throughout his career. He scored 74 in Serie A, and scored over 300 at all levels. He started right at the bottom, it’s not possible to start from a more provincial province than he did. He is Dario Hubner, one of the most prolific goalscorers of the 1990s, but who only ever played for provincial clubs. He was a rebel, someone who never took much care over his hair or his beard – he normally went out onto the pitch looking as if he’d just woken up. “I became a real player at Cesena, and although I moved around a lot afterwards I had a lot of fun doing it.”

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Francesco Antonioli: Coppa Italia gives Cesena chance to shine against Roma

AS Roma Match Program (F. Viola) He wasn’t born in Cesena, but the Emilian city is like home for him now. Francesco Antonioli played 145 times for Roma, 10 of which were in the Coppa Italia, winning the scudetto and a Supercoppa with the Giallorossi. Now he’s Cesena’s goalkeeping coach, and while he’s preparing for an always emotional return to the Olimpico, he says that “Life’s good in Cesena, there’s the right sort of relaxed atmosphere to allow us to work well here.”

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Edin Dzeko: Some fans can’t wait to criticise me, but I want to win at Roma

Il Messaggero (Alessandro Angeloni, Stefano Carina, Massimo Caputi and Ugo Trani) People have said that, as a person, he’s a different class and someone who is culturally above average. After spending about an hour with him at Trigoria, we can confirm that’s true: Edin Dzeko is a different class, and culturally above average. A man of substance, not just playing the act. He’s philosophical. He’s simple, sincere, serene. Cheerful. He also smiles when he talks about his mistakes and the insults directed at him. He’s slightly surprised when he sits down to see multiple cameras and four open notebooks in front of him. “How many of you are there?” he exclaims, as if to ask why there is so much attention being given to him. “This isn’t an interview, it’s a forum,” Edin jokes. It soon becomes a – very simple – conversation, which Dzeko uses to tell his story. “If you have any problems, just speak in English,” we suggest to him. But he chooses not to: he always speaks in Italian, however he can, even when he inevitably finds a hole in his vocabulary and struggles to find the right words. Edin stops, thinks, finds the right word (and if he doesn’t find it, he invents one) and carries on, just like he does after he misses a chance in front of goal. Mistakes, (pot)holes, we’re used to everything in Rome. “Rome is a wonderful city, especially for someone who has lived in places like Manchester and Wolfsburg. Of course, it can be difficult to drive around – the streets are like Sarajevo’s after the bombing. You can see that it’s a city in difficulty, in crisis. It needs investment, the streets can’t be left abandoned like this.”

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